Tuesday, 06 December 2022 00:00

Foot deformities are among the most common deformities in newborns. Most of the foot problems newborns face are treated non-surgically. Such newborn deformities include clubfoot, which describes an array of foot deformities that lead a newborn’s feet to be twisted, pointed down, and inward. Approximately half of the babies with clubfoot have it on both feet and boys are more apt to have clubfoot than girls. This affliction does not cause a baby pain, but it can lead to long-term difficulties with walking. If treated with stretching exercises, casts, or surgery, a clubfoot deformity can be corrected in early childhood. If you are pregnant and expect your baby to be born with clubfoot, or you have such a newborn, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist as soon as possible for treatment to prevent any long-term impact from this condition.

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Steven Black, DPM of California . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 29 November 2022 00:00

When athletes, and especially runners, stretch tight calf muscles, they may be doing more harm than good to the Achilles tendon, experts say. Short active stretches may be more beneficial than passive stretching, where the heel is pressed downward and held for an extended period of time. Research has shown an overload on the Achilles tendon can cause it to become inflamed. When a typical calf/Achilles tendon stretch is performed, it’s normal for the tendon to press against the heel bone. However, when this position is gained too forcefully or sustained for too long it can become a problem. In fact, it is believed that overdoing a heel drop stretch of the Achilles tendon and calf can actually contribute to Achilles tendonitis. For this reason, experts recommend a heel drop flat against the floor rather than from a stair step, where the heel goes below the horizontal plane. Instead, massage, foam rolling, and double heel raises can help do the job of relieving tightness. For more detailed guidance on how to avoid Achilles tendonitis, please consult a podiatrist.

 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Steven Black, DPM of California . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 22 November 2022 00:00

Morton’s neuroma is named for a doctor who discovered this condition in 1876. It affects the nerve that runs between the long bones of the foot, commonly the 3rd and 4th metatarsals. The main symptoms of Morton’s neuroma are pain and numbness in the toes above the affected metatarsals. It can produce the same symptoms in the nerve between the 2nd and 3rd metatarsals. Morton’s neuroma usually affects only one foot and rarely affects two nerves of the same foot. The exact cause of Morton’s neuroma is not clear, but it is thought to be the result of a thickening of the nerve. This effect may be produced by chronic compression of the nerves. About three-quarters of people with Morton’s neuroma are women between the ages of 40 and 50. It is believed that tight or poorly fitting shoes greatly contribute to the formation of Morton’s neuroma, and it is common among runners and ballet dancers. Symptoms include pain that starts in the ball of the foot and shoots into the nearby toes. There also may be burning and tingling, along with a feeling of having a small pebble in the shoe. For a diagnosis and treatment options for Morton’s neuroma, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist. 

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Steven Black, DPM of California . Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 15 November 2022 00:00

Constant care and regular evaluation are important for a foot or ankle fracture. If left untreated, foot or ankle fractures can worsen over time and create more serious problems.

Don't wait to be examined if you believe you've experienced a foot or ankle fracture.

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